Vision Maker Media - Public Media Content Fund

Vision Maker Media - Public Media Content Fund

Vision Maker Media invites proposals for programs intended for Public Television that represent the experiences, values and cultures of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Each year, Vision Maker Media awards over $500,000 in production contracts to independent producers and public television stations to produce programming by and about Native Americans for use by PBS stations. Funding can be for production, completion, or research & development.

Projects should be accessible to a broad audience, have the potential for a national broadcast, and be used for effective outreach/community engagement activities to reach audiences beyond a Public Television broadcast.

NOTE

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Projects should be accessible to a broad audience, have the potential for a national broadcast, and be used for effective outreach/community engagement activities to reach audiences beyond a Public Television broadcast. Assignment of exclusive broadcast rights for four years and one year off-air recording rights for educators are included in Vision Maker Media´s Production License Agreement. All completed Projects are required to meet the PBS Technical Operating Specifications and Production Guidelines as outlined in the PBS Red Book online.

Projects will be offered additional distribution opportunities through Vision Maker Media, including educational and home DVD distribution through http://shopvisionmaker.org. Theatrical, non-theatrical, television (free, pay syndicated and video-on-demand), multimedia and Internet broadcasting (including podcasting and streaming) rights can also be included in this distribution opportunity.

The panel considers these factors for delivering a successful application:
• Strength of Storytelling. Is the story compelling, engaging, original and well-conceived?
Does the content and style show originality?
• Power of the Project. How is the subject matter important to the national Native community? Does it show accuracy of Native content and portrayal? Does it shed new light on and spur dialogue about the Native experience?
• Audience Potential. Will the Project appeal not only to Native American viewers, but to a broader Public Media audience?
• Project Reach. Is there evidence that new media will be used to enhance the Project and broaden its impact? Is there a plan for educational materials, outreach and/or community engagement to support the broadcast? Will it have a life beyond the broadcast?
• Demonstrated ability to complete the Project. Can the proposed team complete the Project within budget, on schedule and with high quality production standards? If an emerging media maker, is he/she supported by an experienced crew?
• Budget. Does the proposed budget match the needs of the Project? Is it appropriate?
• Funding for production or completion. Are funds already committed? Has the filmmaker identified potential funders or outlined plans for fund raising? Are the proposed funders appropriate for the Project?
Does the fund raising plan complement the timeline for completing the work?
• Native American participation. Are Native people in key creative positions (producer, director, director of photography, writer, editor)? Are there opportunities for training or internships?

Deadline: 1 March

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